Nursing News 7/14: Coronavirus Could Pass In Utero, TB Vaccine Could Decrease COVID-19 Deaths & New Statement From AAP About Reopening Schools

Nursing News 7/14: Coronavirus Could Pass In Utero, TB Vaccine Could Decrease COVID-19 Deaths & New Statement From AAP About Reopening Schools

This week in Clipboard Health’s Nursing News round-up … 

Pregnant Women Can Pass Coronavirus to Fetus in Rare Cases According to Studies

A small study in Italy that looked at 31 women showed that a pregnant woman can pass the coronavirus behind COVID-19 to the fetus in utero, although the instances are rare. This type of transmission is called vertical transmission and includes other viruses like HIV and Zika. In the study, one newborn tested positive for coronavirus, and the researchers found the virus in the newborn’s umbilical cord blood and placenta.

Study Says Tuberculosis Vaccine May Be Tied To Lower COVID-19 Deaths

A recent study has looked at whether or not a vaccine used for tuberculosis could decrease the risk of death from COVID-19. The researchers found a relation between populations that had commonly received the bacillus Calmette−Guérin (BCG) vaccine versus populations that hadn’t. 

In one particular example in the study, mortality rates from COVID-19 were almost three times higher in senior populations that hadn’t received the TB vaccine compared to others that had in the same country.

U.S. Pediatricians’ New Statement Encourages Use of Science in Deciding to Reopen Schools

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At the end of June, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a statement about the importance of reopening in-person school for children. At the end of the week, the organization released a new statement clarifying their statement that reopening schools should rely on science-based evidence and public health agency recommendations.

Study Indicates 90% of Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients May Still Have Symptoms Two Months Later

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In another study from Italy, one of the worst-hit countries for the COVID-19 pandemic, a small-scale study looked at recovering COVID-19 patients two months after hospitalization and found that more than half still had three or more symptoms while another 30% had one or two symptoms. Researchers made it clear in the study that there is still a lot they don’t know about the long-term effects of COVID-19, and that more studies are needed to look into the issue.

CDC Estimates About 50% of COVID-19 Patients Are Asymptomatic

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A new estimate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that the CDC believes about 40% of COVID-19 cases are asymptomatic. Of those cases, there’s a 75% chance that those people who test positive for the virus or have no symptoms can spread the virus to other people. 

Autopsies Find Blood Clots in “Almost Every Organ” from COVID-19 Patients

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Pathologists conducting autopsies on deceased COVID-19 patients are using the opportunity to try to learn more about how the disease affects the body. One particular finding from these autopsies is that some COVID-19 patients have extensive blood clotting issues throughout the body. These types of discoveries help pathologists understand what the disease can do to the body in the hopes of knowing better how to treat it.

Michelle Paul

Michelle Paul is an RN Content Specialist at Clipboard Health. She has worked with a variety of patient demographics, ranging from young adults in foreign countries, to elderly residents in skilled nursing facilities, to healthy blood donors in her community. Her experience in content creation gives her a unique perspective on communication within the healthcare field.