CNA Salary: What Does a CNA Get Paid (State-by-State)

CNA Salary: What Does a CNA Get Paid (State-by-State)

The certified nursing assistant (CNA) role is considered an entry-level job in the healthcare industry. However, a CNA is an essential part of patient care and is a valued addition to nearly all healthcare teams. Salaries for CNAs vary from state to state, and several factors can affect the reason earnings may be higher or lower compared to the average.

Location 

Typically, positions in larger, more populated cities offer higher salaries. The cost of living is higher, and employers must consider that when paying their employees. According to recent surveys, California, New York, and Alaska offer the most substantial median annual pay for CNAs. 

Type of Employer

Be sure to research what type of organization your employer identifies as when you’re considering employment options. There are government agencies, private and public hospitals, long-term care facilities, and home healthcare groups, to name a few. While the pay at a nursing home might be slightly less than a large hospital, keep in mind that your list of responsibilities at a nursing home may be smaller, too. 

Skillset

The more experience you have, the more you have an opportunity for pay increases. Specializations in various departments, such as labor and delivery or ICU, will serve you well as you negotiate salary. As you grow in your field and complete advanced certifications, you create the opportunity for increased compensation. 

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) performed an income survey for nursing assistants in 2019.

CNA Pay — State by State

Alabama$24,590 
Alaska$40,320
Arizona$32,640
Arkansas$25,950 
California$36,630
Colorado$33,980
Connecticut$34,360
Delaware$31,770
Florida$27,790
Georgia$27,890
Hawaii$37,710
Idaho$28,950
Illinois$29,760
Indiana$28,610
Iowa$30,520
Kansas$27,280
Kentucky$27,280
Louisiana$23,340
Maine$30,770
Maryland$32,450
Massachusetts$35,040
Michigan$31,220
Minnesota$35,150
Mississippi$23,980
Missouri$26,490
Montana$30,440
Nebraska$29,920 
Nevada$34,890 
New Hampshire$33,430 
New Jersey$31,190 
New Mexico$28,850
New York$38,810
North Carolina$26,540
North Dakota$34,320
Ohio$28,690 
Oklahoma$26,030
Oregon$34,780
Pennsylvania$31,590
Rhode Island$33,020
South Carolina$26,560
South Dakota$28,120
Tennessee$27,250
Texas$27,930
Utah$28,890
Vermont$31,710
Virginia$29,400
Washington$33,800
West Virginia$26,900
Wisconsin$31,280
Wyoming$31,930

A passion for serving others is what aspires most to have a career as a CNA. Another perk to working as a CNA is that you can start working immediately after completing a state-approved CNA training program. Typically, experience is not required to land your first job. 

There is an expectation that the demand for CNAs will grow due to the aging US population — this offers the career field a substantial amount of job security. CNAs will continue to play an invaluable role in nursing and long-term care centers. 

Find CNA shifts available in your area today! Download the Clipboard Health app to apply.